United Houma Nation Partners up with Nicholl’s Senior-Run Magazine Garde Voir Ci

The Nicholls State University Garde Voir Ci magazine students with the professors, UHN Elders, Chief, and UHN First Lady.

Houma, LA– The United Houma Nation has partnered up with the Nicholls State University’s Mass Communication Department senior-run magazine Garde Voir Ci for their “Lost Bayou Series.” The term Garde Voir Ci is a Cajun phrase that means “look at this.” This project is helping collect, digitize, and tell the stories of the tribal citizens in the United Houma Nation.

From Left to Right (Garde Voir Ci Assistant Professor Nicki Boudreaux, Elder Corine Paulk, Chief August "Cocoa" Creppel, Layla Creppel, Elder Charlie Duthu, Garde Voir Ci Professor Laure Kasovich)
From Left to Right (Garde Voir Ci Assistant Professor Nicki Boudreaux, Elder Corine Paulk, Chief August “Cocoa” Creppel, Layla Creppel, Elder Charlie Duthu, Garde Voir Ci Professor Laure Kasovich)

“We are so happy to be working alongside Nicholls State University,” said Chief August ‘Cocoa’ Creppel. “This is a monumental moment for our tribe and a chance to tell the many stories from our Elders.”

Recently, the students were able to gather at our new tribal office that we are in the process of renovating to view some of the tribe’s art, historical documents and photos. We had special guests including four of our Elders, Louise Billiot, Corine Paulk, Charlie Duthu, and Marie Billiot. Chief Creppel and Layla Creppel had gifted the students with drumming and singing.

Louise and Marie Billiot showed the students how to make traditional fry bread which is very popular at the Jazz and Heritage Festival in New Orleans.

Student Brendan Landry and Elder Louise Billiot cooking fry bread for the event. (Photo Cred: Laure Kasovich)
Brendan Landry, a student from Garde Voir Ci, and Louise Billiot cooking fry bread for the event. (Photo Cred: Laure Kasovich)

“Everyone makes fry bread different,” explained Louise Billiot. “It was exciting to see the students wanting to get hands on with our culture.”

The Lost Bayou Series tells the many stories from communities in Louisiana that have been affected in a variety of ways including land loss and environmental threats. Many of these harsh conditions have pushed communities in south Louisiana from their homes, land, and family. The United Houma Nation has historically been pushed out of their communities due to land manipulation, environmental threats, land loss, and prejudice. These events still continue to this day.

“The students have already done so many great things for our people,” Chief Creppel stated. “It’s been so exciting to see the student’s interest in our culture and traditions.”

The Garde Voir Ci is looking for any tribal citizens who are wanting to tell their stories. If you are interested please message the Managing Editor Addie Wetzel at [email protected].

Click here to view the United Houma Nation in “the Lost Bayou series.”